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Wolfgang, Amadeus and Mozart, 20 Euro, Silver 900, Proof, Austria, 2016

129.00

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Δόσεις Υπολογισμός μεταφορικών

Wolfgang, Amadeus and Mozart are the names on three silver coins dedicated to Austria’s most famous son. Wolfgang (2015), the first coin, is dedicated to Mozart’s boyhood as a wunderkind; Amadeus (2016), the second coin, to his short but prolific adult life, which established his genius; while the third coin, Mozart (2016), focuses on his musical afterlife and the legend that he became after his premature death. To a certain extent the three coins represent the three acts that made up Mozart’s life as well as his amazing legacy, which lives on more than 200 years after his death.

The obverse of each coin in the series boasts a portrait of Mozart, while the reverse shows a detail from one of Mozart’s works from the period in question. Wolfgang features the comic opera, Bastien und Bastienne (1768), Amadeus features Don Giovanni (1787), while Mozart features the Magic Flute (1791).

 

Ασήμι (Silver)
34 mm
(?)
2016
(?)
Proof

Type the characters you see in the picture above.

The first coin in this three-part series is dedicated to Mozart’s childhood, which began in Salzburg on 27 January 1756. It soon became apparent that a genius had come into the world; one that worked wonders and still does today. A 1993 study claimed that Mozart’s music makes the listener more intelligent. Subsequent studies could not confirm this, but there is little doubt that Mozart’s music makes things seem better. This is a very special coin for a very special child.

 

The sublime second coin in the Austrian Mint’s three-coin Mozart series, Amadeus shines the spotlight on Mozart during his adult years. The Vienna music world made him rich, yet he died in debt. But this little gem shows that the music of the greatest composer of all time is priceless.

A profile portrait of a pensive Mozart graces the obverse of the third and final coin in our Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart series. Painted by his brother-in-law Joseph Lange, the portrait gives the impression that Mozart is eavesdropping on his inner music. The reverse shows a scene from his best-loved Opera, The Magic Flute. At its premiere in 1791, the opera received a great response from the audience, yet just a few weeks after this triumph, Mozart was dead at the tender age of 35. He may have died young but his legend lives on.

Born on 27 January 1756 in Salzburg, the son of a musician, teacher and minor composer, Mozart showed such musical talent from an early age that his father Leopold gave up composing to focus on his son’s musical development. The coin’s obverse features a wonderfully enigmatic portrait of Wolfgang from that period, painted in 1763. Although from a bourgeois background, Mozart is dressed in aristocratic clothes that were a gift from Empress Maria Theresa. The word ‘Wolfgang’ lies beneath the portrait so that, when placed alongside the other two coins in the series, the three coins together spell the composer’s full name. The coin’s reverse shows a scene from Bastien und Bastienne, a one-act comic opera written by the twelve-year-old Mozart in 1768.

As in the case of some of the latter-day rock stars who died tragically young, the Mozart legend is not only a product of his undoubted creative genius, but also of his larger-than-life personality. Mozart’s phenomenal work ethic, extravagant lifestyle and flamboyant nature have been dramatized on numerous occasions; most famously in the play Amadeus by Peter Shaffer, which was later made into a hugely successful movie by Miloš Forman, winning eight Oscars. Mozart died at the tender age of 35 in December 1791, just weeks after the premiere of his best-loved opera The Magic Flute, which was a popular triumph. The coin’s reverse shows a scene from the opera, while a profile portrait of a pensive Mozart graces the obverse. Painted by his brother-in-law Joseph Lange, the portrait gives the impression that Mozart is eavesdropping on his inner music. The word ‘Mozart’ lies beneath the portrait so that, when placed alongside the other two coins in the series, the three coins together spell the composer’s full name. 

After a period of intensive travel, which raised his profile and earned him numerous commissions, Mozart left his job as the court organist in Salzburg and went to Vienna in 1781. Although he was at his creative peak in the capital, his extravagant lifestyle meant that he saved little, even refusing to curb his spending during periods of financial difficulty. One of his many triumphs, Don Giovanni was premiered in Prague on 29 October 1787. A scene from the opera features of the coin’s reverse, while a portrait of Mozart, painted by Barbara Krafft in 1819, 28 years after his untimely death at the age of 35, features on the coin’s obverse.

 
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